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Phrasal verbs 2 – in/out

Phrasal verbs with in and out.

Let’s start with the most obvious question here: 
What IS a phrasal verb?
Put simply, a phrasal verb consists of two words (sometimes three) – a verb and a preposition.

Remember, a ‘preposition’ is a short word used to talk about time or place. Some examples include at, in, on, under, between, by, up.

What phrasal verbs are there with in and out?
There are quite a few! But here are some of the ones you’re likely to come across:

Check in / check out:

You need to check in at the airport at least an hour before your flight.
Here, ‘check in’ means to give your bags to the airport and get your boarding pass.

The hotel’s checkout time is 11 a.m.
This is the time you MUST leave the hotel.

It IS okay to split these verbs, for example: check the guest in.

Get in / get out:

Hurry up and get in the car.
This means to enter the car.

Can I get out here please?
This means to exit, and we might say it to a taxi driver.

Remember, with transport, we only use ‘get in/get out’ for cars, taxis, helicopters, and boats (but not ships or ferries! For other kinds of transport, we use different phrasal verbs!

Get out can also be used for other things we need to move or leave. For example: Can you get out your books, please? Or you’re late! You need to get out of bed NOW!

It IS okay to split these verbs, for example: get the children in.

Hand in / hand out:

Please hand in your homework before you leave.
This means to give your work to the teacher.

Ahmed, can you hand out the exercises please?
This means to give one to everybody.

It IS okay to split these verbs, for example: hand the work in.

Move in / move out:

Our new house is much bigger, and we’re moving in on Monday!
‘Move in’ here means arrive for the first time to live in a new house.

Sorry about all the boxes, we’re going to move out of this office next week.
We can use ‘move in/move out’ for places of work as well as where we live. ‘Move out’ means to leave.

Remember, we can use the simple or the continuous form (-ing) with these verbs.

It IS okay to split these verbs, for example: move the furniture in.

Remember: ‘Split’ means separate, or put something in the middle.

Look out!

Phrasal verbs that look like opposites might not always be, so check in a dictionary if you’re unsure!

For example: fill in a form and fill out a form are the same!

Don’t forget!

1. We can use the simple or continuous form of the verb in these phrasal verbs. 

2. There are many other examples for you to find!

3. In the examples given, you can split the phrase. (Give in the homework or give the homework in).  You cannot do this with all phrasal verbs. If in doubt, check in a dictionary! 

Phrasal verbs with ‘out’:

When can we use ‘out’ as a part of a phrasal verb?

There are many examples, but we’ll just look at a few today.

 

Break out (1):

The criminals made careful plans to break out of prison.

They wanted to escape.

 

Break out (2):

Fighting broke out when the workers were told they couldn’t have more money.

Fighting started. (Note: we often use the past tense with ‘break out’ phrasal verbs).

 

Carry out:

If you carry out the instructions exactly as they are written, you won’t have a problem.

Follow the instructions and do what they say.

 

Check out:

The neighbors heard noises coming from the empty house and called the police to check it out.

See if there is a problem or go and look at something. Note: ‘it’ means the house. Like most of the phrasal verbs studied today, you can split check out.

 

Hang out (1):

When I was a teenager, my favourite thing to do was to just hang out with my friends.

Spend time with them, not doing anything special. Note: in THIS use of hang out we cannot split the phrase.

 

Hang out (2):

I’m just going to hang out the washing to dry.

Put the clothes I washed outside to dry in the sun. Note: in THIS use of hang out we CAN split the phrase!

 

Remember, we can use simple or continuous (-ing) form of the verbs in the present or the past.

‘Split’ means to separate or put something in the middle.

Look out!

If in doubt when to split or not split a phrasal verb, always check!

We can’t say, ‘I like to hang my friends out’ but we can say ‘Please hang the washing out’.

Don’t forget!

1. The same phrasal verbs often have several different meanings. It can be fun to see how many we can find! 

2. The verb can be used in the present or past tense.

3. We can use the simple or the continuous form (-ing) of the verbs.

4. Not all phrasal verbs can be split. If in doubt, check.

Phrasal verbs with ‘on’ and ‘off’

When can we use ‘on’ or ‘off’ as a part of a phrasal verb?

There are many examples, but we’ll just look at a few today.

 

Carry on:

They carried on hiking until it started getting dark, and then put up their tents.

This means they continued hiking. 

 

Carry off:

Her last film carried off 15 wins at the awards ceremony.

This means it won lots of awards. 

 

Get on:

You must buy your ticket before you get on the bus.

This means to enter the bus. 

 

Get off:

Get off the train at the last stop.

This means to leave the train. 

 

Note: Get on / Get off, when used for transport, is used for buses, trains, planes, bikes, motorbikes, ferries, and ships. It is not used for cars, taxis, or small boats.

 

Hold on:

Hold on a couple of minutes, and I’ll try and find her.

This means to wait a few minutes. 

 

Hold off:

I would prefer you hold off telling them until after the party.

Delay doing something: You can tell them – but wait until after the party is over. 

 

Remember, we can use simple or continuous (-ing) form of the verbs in the present or the past.

With all these examples, the phrasal verb cannot be split (separated or have something put in the middle).

Look out!

If in doubt when to split or not split a phrasal verb, always check!

While the phrases with these meanings cannot be split, many others can. For example: Your shoes are wet, get them off now!

Don’t forget!

1. Phrasal verbs often have several different uses. You have only been given one example of when to use each of them. See how many more you can find!

2. The verb can be used in the present or past tense.

3. We can use the simple or the continuous form (-ing) of the verbs.

4. Not all phrasal verbs can be split. If in doubt, check.

Phrasal verbs with ‘up’ and ‘down’

When can we use ‘up’ or ‘down’ as a part of a phrasal verb?

There are many examples, so we’re going to look at a few today.

 

Back up:

Always back up the work you do on your computer. 

This means to make a copy. Note: here, ‘back up’ can be split.

 

Back down:

Her mother backed down and decided to allow her daughter to go to the party.

This means she changed her mind about the punishment, and let her daughter meet her friends. Note: here, ‘back down’ cannot be split.

 

Break up:

The teacher had to step in and break up the fight between the two boys.

This means the teacher had to stop the fight. Note: here, ‘break up’ can be split. He broke the fight up.

 

Break down:

Jane broke down when she heard the news.

This means she lost control of her emotions and started to cry. Note: here, ‘break down’ cannot be split.

 

Cut up:

After he broke his arm, his mother helped him at meal times by cutting up his food.

This means she used a knife to make smaller pieces of food for him to eat. Note: here, ‘cut up’ can be split, she cut his food up into smaller pieces.

 

Cut down:

She has cut down on how much coffee she drinks a day.

This means reduced. 

Note: here, ‘cut down’ can be splitshe cut the number of cups down to three a day.

 

Remember, we can use simple or continuous (-ing) form of the verbs in the present or the past.

‘Split’ means to separate or put something in the middle.

Look out!

If in doubt when to split or not split a phrasal verb, always check!

Don’t forget!

1. Phrasal verbs often have several different uses. You have only been given one example of when to use each of them. See how many more you can find!

2. The verb can be used in the present or past tense.

3. We can use the simple or the continuous form (-ing) of the verbs.

4. Not all phrasal verbs can be split. If in doubt, check.

Phrasal verbs with ‘up’

 

When can we use ‘up’ as a part of a phrasal verb?

There are many examples, so we’re going to look at a few today.

 

Add up:

Her story just doesn’t add up. She’s told us all different things!

This means it doesn’t make sense or seem right. 

Note: here, ‘add up’ cannot be split.

 

Bring up:

She’s bringing up her children alone and working full-time!

This means she is taking care of her children by herself. 

Note: here, ‘bring up’ can be split.

 

Dress up:

They loved going out for brunch, and always got dressed up!

This means putting on smart or elegant clothes that wouldn’t be worn every day. Brunch is a meal between breakfast time and lunch time, that can last for a long time! 

Note: here, ‘dress up’ can be split, but normally only with a reflexive pronoun (yourself, herself). They dressed themselves up nicely and went to the horse race.

 

End up:

If you don’t start getting to work on time, you’ll end up getting fired.

This means the final result will be you’ll lose your job. 

Note: here, ‘end up’ cannot be split.

 

Get up:

I always get up early, even when I don’t have to work.

This means to leave your bed in the morning. 

Note: here, ‘get up’ can be split. His mum always gets him up for school.

 

Remember, we can use simple or continuous (-ing) forms of the verbs in the present or the past.

‘Split’ means to separate or put something in the middle.

Look out!

If in doubt when to split or not split a phrasal verb, always check!

Don’t forget!

1. Phrasal verbs often have several different uses. You have only been given one example of when to use each of them. See how many more you can find!

2. The verb can be used in the present or past tense.

3. We can use the simple or the continuous form (-ing) of the verbs.

4. Not all phrasal verbs can be split. If in doubt, check.

Phrasal verbs with ‘up’

 

When can we use ‘up’ as a part of a phrasal verb?

There are many examples, so we’re going to look at a few more today.

 

Keep up:

If you don’t keep up with the rest of the group, you’ll get lost!

This means to move at the same speed as everyone else. 

Note: here, ‘keep up’ cannot be split.

 

Make up:

You know they had a huge fight last year and stopped talking? Well, they made up last week and everything is fine now.

When people stop being friends, and then become friends again, we say they ‘make up’. 

Note: here, ‘make up’ cannot be split.

 

Own up:

James eventually owned up to losing the ring.

To ‘own up’ means to admit to something. 

Note, here, ‘own up’ cannot be split.

 

Shut up:

Anna’s sister kept talking during the movie, so eventually Anna shouted at her to shut up.

To tell someone to ‘shut up’ isn’t very polite, but it means to be quiet and to stop talking. 

Note: usually ‘shut up’ cannot be split, but occasionally we might hear something like, ‘Please shut her up.’

 

Use up:

Bill always used up the milk and never replaced it.

To ‘use up’ something means to finish it so there is none left. Note: ‘use up’ can be split, and it is common to say, ‘use it up’, or ‘use something up’.

 

Remember, we can use simple or continuous (-ing) form of the verbs in the present or the past.

‘Split’ means to separate or put something in the middle.

Look out!

If in doubt when to split or not split a phrasal verb, always check!

Don’t forget!

1. Phrasal verbs often have several different uses. You have only been given one example of when to use each of them. See how many more you can find!

2. The verb can be used in the present or past tense.

3. We can use the simple or the continuous form (-ing) of the verbs.

4. Not all phrasal verbs can be split. If in doubt, check.

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘away’

When can we use ‘away’ as a part of a phrasal verb?

There are many examples, but we’re just going to look at a few today.

 

Go away:

I go away every winter and spend all of it in a hot country.

To ‘go away’ means to leave a place. 

Note: here, ‘go away’ cannot be split.

 

Give away:

Every year after her birthday, Sally liked to give away some of her older toys to children that didn’t have so many.

To ‘give away’ means to let someone else have your things for free. 

Note: here, ‘give away’ can be split.

She gave her toys away.

 

Take away:

She always went to one of her favourite restaurants on Fridays, ordered food to take away, and went home to eat it and watch TV.

To ‘take away’ something means to move it from one place to another. In the example above, it refers to food. Note: here, ‘take away’ can be split.

Also note, in English many words can be used as verbs and nouns. In the case of food, people often use ‘take away’ as a noun. Shall we get a take-away from the local Greek restaurant tonight? 

 

Phrasal verbs with ‘back’

When can we use ‘back’ as a part of a phrasal verb?

Again, there are many examples, and here are just a few of them:

 

Go back:

Helen loved Greece so much that she continued to go back there year after year.

To ‘go back’ means to return to a place or thing. 

Note: here, ‘go back’ cannot be split.

 

Give back:

Can you give me back my book back please?

To ‘give back’ means to return something. 

Note: here, ‘give back’ can be split.

 

Take back:

I need to take back my new shoes. They’ve already broken!

To ‘take back’ something, in this example, means to return it to where it came from because there’s a problem with it. Note: here, ‘take back’ can be split.

 

Remember, we can use simple or continuous (-ing) form of the verbs in the present or the past.

‘Split’ means separate or put something in the middle.

Look out!

If in doubt when to split or not split a phrasal verb, always check!

Don’t forget!

1. Phrasal verbs often have several different uses. You have only been given one example of when to use each of them. See how many more you can find!

2. The verb can be used in the present or past tense.

3. We can use the simple or the continuous form (-ing) of the verbs.

4. Not all phrasal verbs can be split. If in doubt, check.

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